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Gemstone

Gemstone

Gemstones have long been believed to carry healing, protective and even magical properties. Today, gemstones are enjoyed for their beauty in jewelry and if, by chance, they carry some mysterious qualities that repel insects, heal illnesses, protect travelers or attract love...why not accept a bit of chance good fortune?


DIAMOND
Diamonds have the longest endurance of any substance known to man. On average they are 3.4 billion years of age. The word “diamond” comes from the Greek word adamas, meaning “unconquerable and indestructible.” Diamonds were worn in ancient times to promote strength, invincibility and courage. Diamond is also the gemstone of love: when carried or worn, diamond is said to advance positive relations with the opposite sex, to conquer infertility and to ensure fidelity. The earliest record of a man giving a diamond to a woman for her hand in marriage was in 1477, when the Archduke of Austria gave one to Mary of Burgundy. Now, more than 500 years later, diamonds are still the most popular gemstones in engagement rings.

EMERALD
The word “emerald” comes from the Greek word smaragdos, meaning “green.” A member of the beryl mineral species, it contains chromium, which gives emerald its green color. In ancient Egypt, this tranquil green gem was highly prized by the wealthy and by priests. It is said that Isis wore a green emerald in her headband and that those who looked upon it would be able to conceive. Emeralds in ancient Rome were highly prized and valued for their calming and soothing effects. Nero watched the Roman games in the Colosseum through a set of highly prized emerald glasses. Emeralds, like almost all green gemstones, are also thought to be advantageous for business/money ventures.

RUBY
Ruby is made of aluminum oxide (corundum). The red in rubies is caused by trace amounts of chromium—the redder the gem, the more chromium. Rubies are found primarily in Myanmar, Thailand and Sri Lanka. The ruby represents the sun power in Hindu ancient writings, and is said to have been given as an offering to Buddha in China and Krishna in India. An ancient belief about rubies was that dreaming of them meant the coming of success in money matters and love.

SAPPHIRE
Sapphire is also made of aluminum oxide and is considered the sister stone to the ruby. It comes in all colors except red, which has been designated as “ruby.” Blue sapphires have enjoyed increased popularity in recent years, which fashion mavens credit to the sapphire engagement ring given to Princess Diana. The Buddhists believe that the sapphire favors devotion and spiritual enlightenment. The ancient Greeks linked sapphire with Apollo, and wore it as an aid to prophecy when consulting oracles.
Gift Card

Gift Card

Hoop Earrings

Hoop Earrings

Hoop symbolize Stregnth and Fashion. Being a circle, hoop earrings show unity, infinity, and wholeness. Hoop earrings have been a staple of Latino culture. As minorities and immigrants in America and Europe, hoop earrings became a symbol of strength, identity, and resistance to discrimination. 
Huggie

Huggie

Huggies are a style of little hoop earrings that 'hug' the earlobe. This means they sit close to your earlobe! They tend to be thicker than the standard hoop and have a lever back meaning the curved back of the earring simply clicks into
January | Garnet

January | Garnet

Jewelry Type

July | Ruby

July | Ruby

June | Alexandrite, Moonstone, & Pearl Rings, Earrings, Bracelets and Necklaces.

June | Alexandrite, Moonstone, & Pearl Rings, Earrings, Bracelets and Necklaces.

Lariat and "Y" Shape

Lariat and "Y" Shape

Lika Behar

Lika Behar

March | Aquamarine

March | Aquamarine

May | Emerald

May | Emerald

Memoire

Memoire

midas chain collection 14k white gold adjustable 1.15 mm

Midas Chain Collection

Multi-Strand is the art of Layering Necklaces that are worn in various lengths

Multi-Strand is the art of Layering Necklaces that are worn in various lengths

Do you love to Layer?  Long necklaces give you the ability to wrap them twice around your neck or wear them long.
Necklace and Pendant Designs

Necklace and Pendant Designs

Necklaces are an ornamental chains or strings of beads, pearls, jewels, diamonds, or chain links worn around the neck. Necklace and Pendants is Jewelry that is wrapped around your neck. The layering of necklaces has become very popular. Let Blacy's Fine Jewelers help you with the art of Layering your necklaces. Add a new necklace to your collection or let us create a new set for you.

October | Opal & Tourmaline

October | Opal & Tourmaline

Pearls

Perhaps the best-loved gems of all time, pearls—both natural and modern cultured pearls—occur in a wide variety of colors. The most familiar colors are white and cream (a light yellowish brown). Black, gray, and silver are also fairly common, but the palette of pearl colors extends to every hue. The main color, or bodycolor, is often modified by additional colors called overtones, which are typically pink (sometimes called rosé), green, purple, or blue. Some pearls also show the iridescent phenomenon known as orient.

https://www.gia.edu/pearl-description

There are four major types of cultured pearls:

  • Akoya—This type is most familiar to many jewelry customers. Japan and China both produce saltwater Akoya cultured pearls.
  • South Sea—Australia, Indonesia, and the Philippines are leading sources of these saltwater cultured pearls.
  • Tahitian—Cultivated primarily around the islands of French Polynesia (the most familiar of these is Tahiti), these saltwater cultured pearls usually range from white to black.
  • Freshwater—These are usually cultured in freshwater lakes and ponds. They’re produced in a wide range of sizes, shapes, and colors. China and the US are the leading sources.
Platinum

Platinum

Platinum is 30 times more rare than gold. If all the platinum ever mined were melted and poured into an Olympic-sized pool, the platinum would barely reach your ankles. Gold, however, would fill three pools. Think about that when you compare platinum with other precious metals, especially if you’re in the market for an engagement ring or wedding band. Precious platinum is truly as rare as your love.

If translated into numbers, platinum—for all of its known deposits—is considerably more rare than gold and is the rarest metal of all. And it is, truly, a gift from the heavens. Found in just a few known regions of the world, including Russia and South Africa, platinum has also been discovered in heavy concentrations in meteorites- first reported in F. G. Hawley’s research papers, published in 1939. Yes, the precious metal that graces your beloved engagement ring is a celestial metal with incomparable qualities of strength, purity, and durability.

Platinum is the natural choice for milestone jewelry, such as engagement rings and wedding bands, because it holds significant gemstones better than any other precious metal. Platinum is extremely durable, so there’s a minimal chance that prongs made from platinum will dislodge your diamond. Diamonds set in platinum are also enhanced by the natural whiteness of the metal, whose glowing patina gets more beautiful with time. And unlike white gold, which retains its whiteness only by being plated with rhodium, platinum will never need re-plating.

Platinum’s purity also means that it is naturally hypoallergenic. Recognized as an element in the 18th century, scientists soon discovered that this unusual white metal, difficult to melt using traditional methods, was also nearly incorruptible by gases or chemicals making it thoroughly non-corrosive. Platinum is also extremely dense. One cubic foot of platinum weighs in at “a little more than 1,330 pounds,” according to precious metals investor I. M. Vronsky, making it 11% heavier than gold. This density has made it a favorite among those who appreciate the feel of a weightier piece of jewelry.

When compared with the gold alloys commonly used in jewelry, platinum contains a higher concentration of its elemental metal. Pure gold is known as 24K, but is much too soft and malleable to be worn in most jewelry, so it must be alloyed with other metals. White or yellow 14K gold contains only 58.5% of the actual metal and 18K contains 75%. Naturally durable yet malleable, platinum need only be mixed with the smallest amount of other platinum group metals to create an alloy that can be molded, cast and shaped into the world’s most elegant jewelry. Platinum jewelry is either 90% or 95% pure platinum.

Look inside a piece of platinum jewelry and you’ll see its purity stamp. The Federal Trade Commission demands specific marks for the content of any precious metal alloy. To protect American consumers, a high-content platinum alloy will be marked 950Pt, 950, plat or platinum, meaning that it’s at least 95% pure, elemental platinum. It’s also the only platinum alloy that can simply bear the “Platinum” stamp to identify that it’s 95% pure platinum. Other common metals that comprise the remaining 5% are iridium, ruthenium or cobalt. Another platinum alloy that’s popular in the United States contains 900 parts platinum to 100 parts other metals. The stamp for this particular alloy, per FTC guidelines, is 900Pt. In the United States, a brand’s registered hallmark must also accompany the purity stamp.

Platinum's resistance to tarnish and corrosion, as well as its silver-like shine and extreme rarity, make it ideal for making jewelry (its second largest usage).

Watchmakers such as Vacheron Constantin, Patek Philippe, and Rolex, use platinum for producing limited edition watch series.

Platinum

Platinum

Physically, platinum is heavy, soft, malleable (easy to work—only silver and gold are easier to shape), ductile (easy to draw into wires), and has a fairly high melting point (~1770°C or 3220°F). Chemically, it's often described as a noble metal because it is so unreactive. It doesn't even react with oxygen in the air so it doesn't rust or tarnish. It's also reasonably resistant to attack from acids. Although platinum earned its name only in the 18th century, platinum metals (and alloys rich in platinum) were known in ancient times. Platinum is thought to have been described for the first time in 1557 by Italian chemist Julius Scaliger (1484–1558), though it was found in large quantities only in 1750 when Spaniards mining for silver in Rio Pinto, Colombia discovered it as an impurity and named it "little silver" (it's also sometimes called "white gold").
Religious

Religious

There are many religions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism.